The Obama administration's shift away from U.S. international radio broadcasting in favor of more high-tech media outlets overlooks the vital role that radio still plays in many parts of the world, including the United States, as Hurricane Sandy has illustrated. In particular, highly reliable and modern radio broadcasts may still be the best bet to reach behind the electronic curtain imposed by dictators.

U.S. Still Needs Radio for Public Diplomacy in the Internet Age

By , , Briefing

During last week’s presidential debate on foreign policy, Republican nominee Mitt Romney missed an opportunity to criticize one aspect of President Barack Obama’s foreign policy that has gone largely unnoticed: the shift away from U.S. international radio broadcasting in favor of more high-tech media outlets.

The dangers of the shift were underscored by a new law spearheaded by Russian President Vladimir Putin that will ban radio broadcasting in Russia starting Nov. 10 by companies that are more than 48 percent foreign-owned. Without protest, the American station Radio Liberty -- Radio Svoboda in Russian -- has decided to comply with the law, ending its morning broadcasts after nearly 60 years on the air. ...

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