Recent violence between Christians and Muslims in Nigeria's Plateau state is the latest outbreak in a cycle of conflict dating back to 1994. though Nigerian authorities have depicted the conflict as primarily local, it aggravates Muslim-Christian relations across the country and undermines the credibility of President Goodluck Jonathan at a time when he was trying to restore his reputation on security issues.

Nigeria's Jonathan Could Pay Political Cost for Religious Violence

By , , Briefing

On July 7-8, Muslim Fulani herdsmen reportedly attacked Christian Berom farmers in Plateau state in Nigeria’s ethnically and religiously diverse Middle Belt. The violence claimed more than 100 lives, including those of two elected officials, and displaced an estimated 5,500 persons. On July 17, an apparent reprisal targeted a Muslim school in the state capital, Jos.

The cycle of Muslim-Christian violence (.pdf) in Plateau dates back to 1994. And though Nigerian authorities have depicted the conflict as primarily local, it aggravates the tone of Muslim-Christian relations across the country and embarrasses the administration of President Goodluck Jonathan, which is attempting to restore security in Nigeria’s majority-Muslim north. The fact that northern Muslim rebel sect Boko Haram claimed involvement in the latest round of violence in Plateau served to further nationalize the conflict. ...

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