With ISIS on Its Heels, the U.S. Should Prepare for Long-Term Deterrence

Iraqi counterterrorism forces hold an ISIS flag they captured regaining control of Hit, Iraq, April 13, 2016 (AP photo by Khalid Mohammed).
Iraqi counterterrorism forces hold an ISIS flag they captured regaining control of Hit, Iraq, April 13, 2016 (AP photo by Khalid Mohammed).

Two years ago the conflict between the self-styled Islamic State (ISIS) and the government of Iraq saw dramatic, unexpected shifts, as large swaths of territory and major cities changed hands. The battle lines moved back and forth. For a while it seemed that the extremists might march triumphantly into Baghdad. But then the Iraqi government and security forces regained their bearing and held on. Slowly the tide turned, at least a bit. Since then, anti-ISIS militias have grown stronger; U.S. air attacks have crippled the group; and the coalition fighting the movement has made strides in shutting down its access […]

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