Will the U.S. Military Continue to Win the Innovation Contest?

Army researchers evaluate a prototype undersuit designed to reduce injuries and fatigue, developed for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Oct. 28, 2014 (U.S. Army photo by Tom Faulkner).
Army researchers evaluate a prototype undersuit designed to reduce injuries and fatigue, developed for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Oct. 28, 2014 (U.S. Army photo by Tom Faulkner).
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Today none of America’s adversaries is close to matching the U.S. military’s capabilities, but U.S. defense leaders, both uniformed and civilian, worry that others are using advances in force-multiplying technologies to catch up. Should these opponents ever come to believe they’ve forged ahead in this race for cutting-edge capabilities, they might be tempted to resort to armed aggression, unleashing a war that would otherwise have been deterred. After all, strategic superiority is not simply a matter of who has the most troops and weapons, who spends the most on defense and who has today’s most advanced technologies. It is also […]

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