Why the World Is Still Not Coming Apart, and How to Know When It Is

Why the World Is Still Not Coming Apart, and How to Know When It Is
Family members, colleagues and friends of the victims of the terrorist attack gather for a memorial ceremony at the Ataturk Airport, Istanbul, June 30, 2016 (AP photo by Emrah Gurel).

Over the past several weeks a new theme about America and the world has emerged: Everything, everywhere, is coming apart. Multiple terrorist attacks in France compete for headlines against a daily drumbeat of bombings claimed by the so-called Islamic State in Turkey, Iraq and Bangladesh. A failed military coup has raised questions about Turkey’s democratic credentials and stability. And in the United States, a race-baiting populist has just become the Republican presidential nominee, at a time when it seems to be open season on black men and police officers in the streets of America’s cities. For someone like me, who […]

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