Where Trump Really Diverges From Republican Foreign Policy Orthodoxy

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin signs the Golden Book of the city during the G20 finance ministers meeting, Baden-Baden, Germany, March 17, 2017 (German Press Agency photo by Christoph Schmidt via AP).
U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin signs the Golden Book of the city during the G20 finance ministers meeting, Baden-Baden, Germany, March 17, 2017 (German Press Agency photo by Christoph Schmidt via AP).

Guest columnist Nikolas Gvosdev is filling in for Steven Metz this week. As the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump enters its third month in office, it is quite striking how conventional its approach to geopolitics has been in practice. Overblown fears that Trump, after his inauguration, would summon his Russian and Chinese counterparts, Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping, to a secret conclave at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, roll out a map of the world, and start negotiating spheres of influence have not materialized. Instead, the United States has continued with its mission to reinforce the eastern flank of […]

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