What Trump’s NFL Spat—and U.N. Speech—Reveal About American Patriotism

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, middle, and teammate Eli Harold, left, kneel during the playing of the national anthem before an NFL football game, Atlanta, Georgia, Dec. 18, 2016 (AP photo by John Bazemore).
Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, middle, and teammate Eli Harold, left, kneel during the playing of the national anthem before an NFL football game, Atlanta, Georgia, Dec. 18, 2016 (AP photo by John Bazemore).
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A week ago, U.S. President Donald Trump stunned the world with his bellicose speech before the United Nations General Assembly. Days later, with the fallout from his remarks still hanging in the air over New York, Pyongyang and Tehran, he abruptly changed the subject. In a stump speech in Alabama on Friday and later on Twitter, Trump called out professional football players who have been kneeling during the playing of the national anthem to protest police brutality against black Americans. The storm of controversy he set off has puzzled foreign observers unfamiliar with the arcana of America’s culture wars, and […]

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