U.S. to Europe: Don’t Go Soft on American-Led Global Order

Samantha Power, United States Permanent Representative to the U.N., briefs the press, United Nations, New York, Sept. 30, 2014 (U.N. photo by Kim Haughton).
Samantha Power, United States Permanent Representative to the U.N., briefs the press, United Nations, New York, Sept. 30, 2014 (U.N. photo by Kim Haughton).
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The United States sent its European allies some stern signals about their obligations to the American-led international order last week. On Monday, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power visited Brussels, where she warned NATO members to halt their “dangerous” defense cuts and called on European powers to offer more troops to United Nations peace operations. Power argued that European armies, which currently provide less than 10 percent of all U.N. peacekeepers worldwide, could have a “momentum-shifting” impact on beleaguered blue helmet missions in trouble spots such as South Sudan. Instead, she underlined, “European countries have drawn back from peacekeeping,” […]

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