U.S. Strikes on Syria Will Make Any U.N.-Brokered Deal Even Harder

The United Nations Security Council holds a meeting on the situation in Syria, New York, April 7, 2017 (AP photo by Mary Altaffer).
The United Nations Security Council holds a meeting on the situation in Syria, New York, April 7, 2017 (AP photo by Mary Altaffer).

U.S. President Donald Trump has punctured the tired but persistent myth that the United Nations Security Council can manage the Syrian civil war. Last night, he ordered cruise missile strikes against Syria without looking for authorization from the United Nations. He did not even wait for Russia and China to veto a U.N. resolution on this week’s chemical attack on the town of Khan Sheikhoun, which would have offered the U.S. an excuse for pursuing unilateral action. This is both refreshing and dangerous. Since 2011, Security Council diplomacy over Syria has frequently been a grotesque farce. The U.S. and its […]

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