Trump’s Victory Was Aided by Russia’s Weaponized Social Media Campaign

Russian President Vladimir Putin during a Cabinet meeting, Moscow, Russia, Sept. 7, 2016 (AP photo by Mikhail Klimentyev).
Russian President Vladimir Putin during a Cabinet meeting, Moscow, Russia, Sept. 7, 2016 (AP photo by Mikhail Klimentyev).
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Historians and politicians will mine the astonishing 2016 U.S. election for years to come, drawing countless lessons about voter dissatisfaction, political acrimony and resistance to social change, among many other mostly domestic problems brought to the surface by the tumultuous campaign. But one of the unexpected mileposts marked by America’s electoral exercise this year lies in the use of a new weapon in global power politics: weaponized social media as an aggressive tool of foreign policy. If war is politics by other means, as the 19th-century military strategist Carl Von Clausewitz famously said, the U.S. election demonstrated that in the […]

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