To Save Afghanistan, the United States Must Be Willing to Walk Away

Army Gen. John W. Nicholson, the U.S. commander in Afghanistan, attends a change of command ceremony, Kabul, Afghanistan, March 2, 2016 (AP photo by Rahmat Gul).
Army Gen. John W. Nicholson, the U.S. commander in Afghanistan, attends a change of command ceremony, Kabul, Afghanistan, March 2, 2016 (AP photo by Rahmat Gul).
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The conflict in Afghanistan played a surprisingly small role in the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, possibly because none of the candidates had any new ideas on what to do about this long-festering problem. But there is an old aphorism sometimes attributed to Leon Trotsky, the Russian revolutionary and communist theorist, that goes, “You may not be interested in war, but war is interested in you.” While Trotsky probably never uttered the phrase, there is something to it. It certainly applies to the conflict in Afghanistan: While the war was not a major topic in Donald Trump’s successful presidential bid, he […]

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