The Pitfalls of Trying to Curb Artificial Intelligence Exports

Zheng Yelai, the president of Huawei cloud BU, during the High-level Dialogue on Artificial Intelligence forum at the China International Big Data Industry Expo 2019, in Guiyang, China, May 27, 2019 (Imaginechina photo Zhui Ying via AP).
Zheng Yelai, the president of Huawei cloud BU, during the High-level Dialogue on Artificial Intelligence forum at the China International Big Data Industry Expo 2019, in Guiyang, China, May 27, 2019 (Imaginechina photo Zhui Ying via AP).

Amid the escalating U.S.-China trade war, concerns over the security implications of competitive Chinese technology like Huawei’s 5G network, and unresolved negotiations with Beijing over the theft of intellectual property, another tech policy question persists in Washington, although it is somewhat overlooked. How should the United States manage exports of artificial intelligence technologies? It has widespread ramifications for global research, innovation and commerce—and no easy answer. In November, the U.S. Commerce Department proposed a new rule on export controls for “emerging technologies that are essential to the national security of the United States.” Biotechnology, advanced computing technology and additive manufacturing—in […]

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