The Defeat of the Islamic State Would Not End the Violence In Iraq

Yazidi fighters head to battle Islamic State militants, on the summit of Mount Sinjar, in Iraq, Dec. 21, 2014 (AP photo by Dalton Bennett).
Yazidi fighters head to battle Islamic State militants, on the summit of Mount Sinjar, in Iraq, Dec. 21, 2014 (AP photo by Dalton Bennett).

After months of military gains by the so-called Islamic State (IS) in Iraq, there is some hope that the tide is turning. Backed by American air strikes, Kurdish fighters broke IS’s four-month siege of Mount Sinjar, freeing thousands of Yazidis who weathered the extremist assault. Meanwhile Iraqi government troops are moving to recapture the Tal Afar military airport, which IS seized last June. As Winston Churchill famously said in November 1942 as Nazi forces in North Africa surrendered, this may not be the beginning of the end, but it is the end of the beginning. During World War II, the […]

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