The Dangerous Assumptions Behind Trump’s Iran Deal Withdrawal

Iranian lawmakers burn pieces of paper representing the American flag and the nuclear deal as they chant slogans against the U.S., Tehran, Iran, May 9, 2018 (AP photo).
Iranian lawmakers burn pieces of paper representing the American flag and the nuclear deal as they chant slogans against the U.S., Tehran, Iran, May 9, 2018 (AP photo).
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On Tuesday, from the Diplomatic Room of the White House, President Donald Trump announced that the United States would withdraw from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, better known as the Iran nuclear deal, which waived multinational sanctions on Iran in exchange for strict controls on Tehran’s nuclear program. Listing a litany of destabilizing actions by the Iranian regime, including sponsorship of terrorism, support to armed proxies, the development of ballistic missiles and “plundering the wealth of its own people,” Trump declared that no action is “more dangerous” than Iran’s “pursuit of nuclear weapons—and the means of delivering them.” The […]

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