Protests in Nicaragua Suddenly Threaten Ortega’s Family Dynasty

A masked protester walks between burning barricades, Managua, Nicaragua, April 20, 2018 (AP photo by Alfredo Zuniga).
A masked protester walks between burning barricades, Managua, Nicaragua, April 20, 2018 (AP photo by Alfredo Zuniga).

Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and his inner circle have spent 11 years methodically securing their dominance over all the levers of power in Central America’s poorest country. It seemed that the aging former rebel leader, and his wife, Vice President Rosario Murillo, had little cause to doubt their ability to maintain their grip. That’s why the events of the past few days came as such a shock. A relatively small protest by college students angry over changes to the social security system suddenly erupted into mass nationwide demonstrations and an explosion of violence that left dozens dead and included calls […]

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