Pope’s Visit Underscores Religion’s Prominence in Global Affairs

Pope Francis at the canonization of Saint John XXIII and Saint John Paul II, Vatican, April 27, 2014 (Aleteia photo by Jeffrey Bruno).
Pope Francis at the canonization of Saint John XXIII and Saint John Paul II, Vatican, April 27, 2014 (Aleteia photo by Jeffrey Bruno).
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The Pope’s visit to the United States this week will include an unprecedented address to the U.S. Congress, opening our eyes to how much has changed in the way religion has become part of American politics and international relations. The head of the Catholic Church has long been seen as a world leader, reaching vast audiences and promoting universal principles of peace and humility. But Pope Francis’ visit seems to represent a step beyond former pontiffs’ travels. His appeal seems to reach across a wide spectrum of believers and more secular audiences who admire his courage and his policy prescriptions. […]

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