Party Divide on Use of Force Resurfaces in Iran Deal Debate

President Barack Obama speaks about the nuclear deal with Iran at American University, Washington, Aug. 5, 2015 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).
President Barack Obama speaks about the nuclear deal with Iran at American University, Washington, Aug. 5, 2015 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).
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Last week at American University, Barack Obama gave one of the most important foreign policy speeches of his presidency. In it, he laid out his detailed argument for supporting the Iran nuclear deal. The president offered a veritable legal brief on why the deal makes the most sense for U.S. national security interests, why it’s better than any alternative, why its critics are wrong and why the agreement builds on a “tradition of strong, principled diplomacy” in U.S. foreign policy. But beyond that, Obama’s speech did something with even greater implications. It highlighted the widening dividing line between Democrats and […]

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