NATO Summit Must Make Further Progress on Smart Defense

Two A-129 Mangusta helicopters fly over an unknown location in Afghanistan, Sept. 8, 2013 (AP photo courtesy of the Italian Army Public Affairs Office in Herat).
Two A-129 Mangusta helicopters fly over an unknown location in Afghanistan, Sept. 8, 2013 (AP photo courtesy of the Italian Army Public Affairs Office in Herat).

Next month’s NATO summit needs to make greater progress on so-called Smart Defense, the alliance-wide effort to get more collective benefits out of individual members’ defense budgets. The initiative aims to induce NATO governments to acquire military capabilities collectively that they cannot afford individually, so that even members with limited resources can contribute to expensive joint projects. The May 2012 Chicago summit launched almost two dozen Smart Defense projects in such areas as logistics and sustainment; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and force protection. One country leads each project. For example, Germany is in charge of pooling maritime patrol aircraft; France […]

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