Libya’s Expanding Proxy War May Be the Ultimate Test of NATO’s Resilience

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel at a conference on Libya at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany, Jan. 19, 2020 (AP photo by Michael Sohn).
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel at a conference on Libya at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany, Jan. 19, 2020 (AP photo by Michael Sohn).

With Egypt reportedly on the brink of invading neighboring Libya, and troops from Chad said to be on their way north to join Gen. Khalifa Haftar in his fight to topple the internationally recognized government in Tripoli, what was already a complicated proxy war could soon become Africa’s first full-on intracontinental war in decades. That may not be all that is at risk, however. If Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi delivers on his promise to come to Haftar’s aid, it could also result in a serious setback for two key American and European security priorities: securing the volatile Eastern Mediterranean […]

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