Japan-South Korea ‘Comfort Women’ Deal Revives U.S. Asia Pivot

A woman who was forced to provide sex for Japanese soldiers during World War II speaks at a rally in front of the Japanese Embassy, Seoul, Dec. 30, 2015 (Kyodo via AP Images).
A woman who was forced to provide sex for Japanese soldiers during World War II speaks at a rally in front of the Japanese Embassy, Seoul, Dec. 30, 2015 (Kyodo via AP Images).
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In the last week of 2015, the United States received a late Christmas present from the governments of Japan and South Korea. The deal reached by Tokyo and Seoul to resolve their differences over the painful issue of Korea’s so-called comfort women—Korean women forced into sexual slavery by Japan during World War II—helped to remove one of the psychological obstacles to strengthening Washington’s strategic alliances in Asia. Only days later, North Korea detonated a nuclear weapon, which served to highlight the common threats and shared interests linking the U.S. and its allies. Now the U.S., South Korea and Japan are […]

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