In Tunisia, Arab Spring Can Be Written Without Quotation Marks

A Tunisian woman shows her ink-stained finger after voting at a polling station in Ben Arous, Tunisia, Oct. 26, 2014 (AP photo by Aimen Zine).
A Tunisian woman shows her ink-stained finger after voting at a polling station in Ben Arous, Tunisia, Oct. 26, 2014 (AP photo by Aimen Zine).
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Years have now passed since one could use the term “Arab Spring” without deliberate irony, or at least quotation marks. Even the sad rhetorical spinoffs from the metaphor—the cold winter, for instance, that followed the spring uprisings—have gone stale from overuse. And yet there is one country where the hopes of the once-euphoric revolutionaries did not turn out to have been misplaced. Dare we say it? Yes, the Arab Spring has bloomed; it has yielded something of a harvest in one country, the country of its birth, Tunisia, whose experience offers some hopeful lessons for a despondent Middle East. Tunisia […]

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