In the Effort To Reduce Weapons Of Mass Destruction, the Glass Looks Half Empty

An anti-war protester wears a mask showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a demonstration against nuclear weapons, Berlin, Germany, Nov. 18, 2017 (AP photo by Michael Sohn).
An anti-war protester wears a mask showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a demonstration against nuclear weapons, Berlin, Germany, Nov. 18, 2017 (AP photo by Michael Sohn).
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Progress in reducing the spread and use of weapons of mass destruction is never linear. But these days, there seem to be more steps backward than forward. From the failure to stop North Korea from becoming the world’s ninth nuclear power to the tragically incomplete diplomatic work to rid Syria of chemical weapons, the efforts to advance global norms to reduce the threats from weapons of mass destruction are falling short. Granting the Nobel Peace Prize to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, which advocated for the new nuclear disarmament treaty that 122 countries voted for at the United […]

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