Why the World’s Newest Country Has Only Known Conflict

Why the World’s Newest Country Has Only Known Conflict
Opposition soldiers during a visit by a cease-fire monitoring team, at an opposition military camp near the town of Nimule in Eastern Equatoria state, South Sudan, Aug. 28, 2019 (AP photo by Sam Mednick).

Few nations have seen their dreams and hopes dashed as quickly and ruthlessly as South Sudan. A mere two years after thousands thronged the streets of the capital, Juba, to celebrate independence from Sudan’s autocratic rule, the country descended into a brutal civil war. The fallout between President Salva Kiir and Vice President-turned-rebel Riek Machar, and the subsequent fighting, exerted a terrible toll. Between 2013 and 2018, up to 400,000 people were killed and 4 million—a third of the country’s population—displaced, amid numerous reports of ethnic-based atrocities like rape and massacres. The world’s youngest country is now approaching its 10-year […]

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