If Chile Can Erupt Over Inequality, Anywhere Can

A protester faces off with an armored police vehicle during an anti-government march in Santiago, Chile, Oct. 22, 2019 (AP photo by Esteban Felix).
A protester faces off with an armored police vehicle during an anti-government march in Santiago, Chile, Oct. 22, 2019 (AP photo by Esteban Felix).
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Until just a few days ago, Chile probably looked to most people like the most stable country in Latin America, and the least likely to erupt in massive social unrest. Few if any countries in the region have experienced decades of economic growth and an expansion of the middle class, alongside reliably fair and competitive elections. And yet last week, the streets of Santiago became the scene of violent clashes between thousands of protesters and security forces, leaving more than a dozen people dead and hundreds arrested. In response, President Sebastian Pinera deployed the military, imposed curfews and announced a […]

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