How America’s Enemies Might Assess U.S. Weaknesses—and Act on Them

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov welcomes North Korea’s special envoy Choe Ryong Hae during a meeting in Moscow, Russia,  Nov. 20, 2014 (AP photo by Ivan Sekretarev).
Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov welcomes North Korea’s special envoy Choe Ryong Hae during a meeting in Moscow, Russia, Nov. 20, 2014 (AP photo by Ivan Sekretarev).

Imagine that somewhere in the world, the leaders of a nation or an extremist organization are meeting to plot ways to confront America. The more astute thinkers among them would have carefully studied U.S. strategy over the past 75 years, looking for America’s strengths and weaknesses and drawing lessons. One lesson they might draw is that trying to intimidate the United States by direct attacks on American soil doesn’t work. The Japanese found this out after Pearl Harbor, as did al-Qaida after 9/11. But striking U.S. military forces deployed to places with limited American national interests can shift U.S. policy—think […]

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