From North Korea to Russia, the U.S. Must Be Selective in Deterring Adversaries

President Donald Trump, accompanied by National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, speaks during a security briefing, Bedminster, N.J., Aug. 10, 2017 (AP photo by Evan Vucci).
President Donald Trump, accompanied by National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, speaks during a security briefing, Bedminster, N.J., Aug. 10, 2017 (AP photo by Evan Vucci).

It is always better to deter an adversary than to fight, but doing so can be a tricky thing. For deterrence to work, adversaries must believe that if they cross some line, they will fail or be punished. In the broad sense, deterrence demands the tangible capability to punish a transgression, along with credibility and clear communication that some specified action will be punished. That may seem simple, but it is not, at least for the United States. The American political system can make it hard to communicate resolve to an adversary. A president may say one thing while other […]

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