AI Has a Ways to Go Before It Replaces Human Creativity

People passing a graffiti mural showing composer Ludwig van Beethoven on a street in Bonn, Germany, Feb. 19, 2020 (AP photo by Martin Meissner).
People passing a graffiti mural showing composer Ludwig van Beethoven on a street in Bonn, Germany, Feb. 19, 2020 (AP photo by Martin Meissner).
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Editor’s note: This is Emily Taylor’s final weekly column. We’d like to thank her for her engaging and compelling coverage of tech issues over the past seven months, and we’re thrilled that she will continue to be a regular WPR contributor. The world premiere of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 10, or Beethoven X, which was completed by artificial intelligence, came and went earlier this month with barely a ripple. At a technical level, the achievement is extraordinary, and the music that resulted from it is not bad. It even sounds a bit Beethovenish. Yet it left this listener rather cold. […]

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