FBI vs. Apple: Finding the Right Balance Between Technology and Security

A locked iPhone, Washington, Feb. 17, 2016 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).
A locked iPhone, Washington, Feb. 17, 2016 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).

The standoff this past week between the U.S. government and the global tech behemoth Apple underscores an enduring condition of our age: Technological innovation is at once a powerful tool to enhance our security, but maximizing its consumer benefits requires resisting government regulation and control. The private sector and government will have to find a more satisfactory partnership if they are to achieve the necessary but difficult balance that entails. The fascinating struggle between the U.S. national security establishment and Apple over unlocking the cellphone of Syed Rizwan Farook—the San Bernadino, California, terrorist—captures many of the dilemmas of the fraught […]

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