Europe Wants ‘Strategic Autonomy,’ but That’s Much Easier Said Than Done

Europe Wants ‘Strategic Autonomy,’ but That’s Much Easier Said Than Done
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg arrive at a press conference, Berlin, Nov. 7, 2019 (dpa photo by Bernd von Jutrczenka via AP Images).

When NATO leaders meet next week in London, one phrase will be on everybody’s lips: European strategic autonomy. While the ambiguous concept is open to competing interpretations, its general thrust is clear. It connotes a growing aspiration among many countries in Europe to set their own global priorities and act independently in security and foreign policy, and to possess sufficient material and institutional capabilities to implement these decisions, with partners of their own choosing. The notion is at the heart of President Emmanuel Macron’s vision of a “sovereign” Europe, and of the ambitions of the incoming president of the European […]

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