Europe Is Losing Patience With Erdogan’s Islamist Rhetoric

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses ruling party lawmakers at the parliament, in Ankara, Turkey, Oct. 28, 2020 (AP photo).
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses ruling party lawmakers at the parliament, in Ankara, Turkey, Oct. 28, 2020 (AP photo).
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As a terrorist attack was unfolding late Monday night in Vienna, where four people were killed and 22 others injured in a shooting rampage on crowded bars, speculation about the culprit, unsurprisingly, was rife on social media. Many of those offering theories were quick to accuse Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of stoking the rage of militant Islamists. There is no indication that the attacker—a young extremist who it turned out had previously been convicted in Austria for trying to join the Islamic State—was motivated by Erdogan, as Austrian authorities have pointed to his ISIS sympathies and the Islamic State’s […]

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