Does Presidential Election Signal a Revolution in U.S. Security Policy?

Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz during a campaign event, Portsmouth, N.H., Feb. 4, 2016, (AP photo by David Goldman).
Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz during a campaign event, Portsmouth, N.H., Feb. 4, 2016, (AP photo by David Goldman).

The 2016 presidential campaign has not yet reached peak intensity, but one thing is already clear: The American public is angry and dissatisfied. As Marc Thiessen wrote in the Washington Post, the big loser in this week’s Iowa caucuses was the political establishment. But although signs of unease in the electorate are stark, it is not yet clear how far this will go. While most of the anger and dissatisfaction focuses on domestic issues, it is also spilling over to national security policy. Support is weakening for the foundational ideas of American strategy that emerged after the 9/11 attacks. As […]

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