Chemical Weapons Convention Faces Challenges Despite Recent Achievements

Chemical Weapons Convention Faces Challenges Despite Recent Achievements

Earlier this year, the Republic of the Congo became the 183rd state party to join the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), which forbids the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, and use of chemical weapons (CW). In addition, the Indian media recently reported that the Indian government had eliminated over 90 percent of its chemical weapons, suggesting the country should fulfill its requirement to eliminate all its CW by April 2009. While welcome, these developments should not obscure the continuing difficulties facing the CWC as its April 2008 review conference approaches.

Ambassador Rogelio Pfirter, head of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the CWC's implementing agency, praised the Congo's ratification, as well as the December 2007 decision of the Iraqi government to join the convention, for moving the CWC closer to its goal of universal acceptance. According to Pfirter, only 12 countries have yet to ratify the CWC.

The Chemical Weapons Convention bans the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, and use of chemical weapons. Its provisions are of indefinite duration and apply to all activities potentially related to chemical weapons. The 500-man OPCW, based in The Hague, oversees the CWC's implementation by monitoring parties' compliance, using on-site inspections and other means.

Keep reading for free!

Get instant access to the rest of this article by submitting your email address below. You'll also get access to three articles of your choice each month and our free newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having a personal curator and expert analyst of global affairs news. Subscribe now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to WPR’s fully searchable library of 16,000+ articles
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday
  • Weekly in-depth reports on important issues and countries
  • Daily links to must-read news and analysis from top sources around the globe, curated by our keen-eyed team of editors
  • The Weekly Wrap-Up email, with highlights of the week’s most important coverage, and what’s to come.
  • Completely ad-free reading.

And all of this is available to you when you subscribe today.

More World Politics Review