Big Power Politics Threaten to Upset U.N. Secretary-General Race

Mogens Lykketoft, president of the U.N. General Assembly, hosting the first-ever televised live debate with Secretary-General candidates, New York, July 12, 2016 (U.N. photo by Evan Schneider).
Mogens Lykketoft, president of the U.N. General Assembly, hosting the first-ever televised live debate with Secretary-General candidates, New York, July 12, 2016 (U.N. photo by Evan Schneider).

Anyone who claims that they know who will be running the United Nations one year from now is a clairvoyant, a fantasist or a liar. The race to replace Ban Ki-moon as secretary-general jolted into life last Thursday, as the Security Council conducted a straw poll on current candidates. The results are open to multiple interpretations. It is possible to argue that the council will select a charismatic politician to replace the underwhelming Ban. But it is equally arguable that it is on track to choose a dull, male leader despite the presence of impressive female candidates. One likely, but […]

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