Abbas Caught Between Israel’s Intransigence and ‘Stabbing Intifada’

A Palestinian kicks a tear gas canister that was fired by Israeli troops during clashes near Ramallah, West Bank, Oct. 20, 2015 (AP photo by Majdi Mohammed).
A Palestinian kicks a tear gas canister that was fired by Israeli troops during clashes near Ramallah, West Bank, Oct. 20, 2015 (AP photo by Majdi Mohammed).

The Israel-Palestine conflict, with all its recurring violence, often seems like the broken record of international affairs. Still this latest wave of lone-wolf Palestinian terrorist attacks followed by predictably harsh Israeli reprisals—and mutual recriminations from both sides that the other is responsible—should come as no surprise. With the collapse of peace talks, the re-election of a right-wing Israeli government opposed to a two-state solution, the continued corruption and dysfunction of the Palestinian leadership and the lack of any realistic path to end the Israeli occupation of the West Bank, the chickens have once again come home to roost in the […]

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