A Fight in the U.K. Reveals the Problems With Internet Governance

Rod Beckstrom, president and chief executive of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, and Kurt Pritz, its senior vice president, speak at a press conference, London, June 13, 2012 (AP photo by Tim Hales).
Rod Beckstrom, president and chief executive of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, and Kurt Pritz, its senior vice president, speak at a press conference, London, June 13, 2012 (AP photo by Tim Hales).
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It’s been called a “coup” attempt at the British registry for .uk domain names, and it has broad implications for internet governance. You may not have heard of Nominet, the company in question. You may not have heard of ICANN, either—the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. But these two nonprofits are quite significant in the inward-looking world of internet governance. Nominet, a not-for-profit company, is owned by approximately 2,500 members—individuals and organizations, from GoDaddy to mom-and-pop shops, that are involved in domain registration and associated services, such as hosting, web design and email provision. Some of those members, […]

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