Zuma’s Testimony to South Africa’s Corruption Inquiry Further Divides the ANC

Former South African President Jacob Zuma appears before the Zondo Commission to respond to allegations of corruption during his presidency, in Johannesburg, July 15, 2019. (Pool Photo by Wikus de Wet via AP Images)
Former South African President Jacob Zuma appears before the Zondo Commission to respond to allegations of corruption during his presidency, in Johannesburg, July 15, 2019. (Pool Photo by Wikus de Wet via AP Images)
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Former South African President Jacob Zuma seems to have decided that given his dire circumstances, with his reputation in freefall and a corruption trial pending, attack is his best form of defense. Over two days in mid-July in Johannesburg, he appeared before the Zondo Commission, which was launched by Zuma’s successor, President Cyril Ramaphosa, last year to investigate the rampant corruption—what is known in South Africa as “state capture”—during Zuma’s troubled presidency. State capture is shorthand for how Zuma allegedly allowed close private business interests to exercise undue influence at the highest levels of government, including over appointments and dismissals […]

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