Years After a Peace Deal, South Sudan Finally Has a Government. Can It Hold?

Years After a Peace Deal, South Sudan Finally Has a Government. Can It Hold?
South Sudanese President Salva Kiir, left, swears in opposition leader Riek Machar as his first deputy, Juba, South Sudan, Feb. 22, 2020 (AP photo by Charles Atiki Lomodong).

Editor’s Note: Every Friday, Andrew Green curates the top news and analysis from and about the African continent.

South Sudan finally has a transitional government, though the country’s citizens and neighboring leaders are watching anxiously to see if this coalition will hold together longer than a previous attempt, which collapsed after only three months.

President Salva Kiir swore in opposition leader Riek Machar as his first deputy last weekend, just ahead of a twice-delayed deadline to form a unity government. Kiir also installed three additional vice presidents—two from the government and one from the opposition; a fifth, drawn from another opposition group, is expected to be named soon, along with a full Cabinet. The transitional body will lead the country until national elections in three years.

Keep reading for free!

Get instant access to the rest of this article by submitting your email address below. You'll also get access to three articles of your choice each month and our free newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having a personal curator and expert analyst of global affairs news. Subscribe now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of tens of thousands of articles.
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday.
  • Regular in-depth articles with deep dives into important issues and countries.
  • The Daily Review email, with our take on the day’s most important news, the latest WPR analysis, what’s on our radar, and more.
  • The Weekly Review email, with quick summaries of the week’s most important coverage, and what’s to come.
  • Completely ad-free reading.

And all of this is available to you when you subscribe today.