With Little Hope for Reform, Lebanon Continues Down the Road to Ruin

An anti-government protester holds a national flag in front of Lebanese army soldiers during a protest in Zalka, Lebanon, Oct. 5, 2020 (AP photo by Hussein Malla).
An anti-government protester holds a national flag in front of Lebanese army soldiers during a protest in Zalka, Lebanon, Oct. 5, 2020 (AP photo by Hussein Malla).

BEIRUT—With yet another failed attempt to form a government and no replacement in sight, Lebanon’s future is looking a lot like its bleak past. The prime minister-designate, Mustapha Adib, resigned in late September after nearly a month of fruitless talks to create a Cabinet of technocrats. French President Emmanuel Macron had publicly backed that process, which came on the heels of Prime Minister Hassan Diab’s resignation following the Aug. 4 port explosion that devastated parts of Beirut.* Nonetheless, Lebanon’s politicians are still mired in a dispute over control of the powerful Finance Ministry, as the economy collapses and the social […]

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