With the ‘Jungle’ Closed in Calais, France’s Migrant Crisis Moves to Paris

Migrants wait to board buses to temporary shelters, Paris, Friday, Nov. 4, 2016 (AP photo by Thibault Camus).
Migrants wait to board buses to temporary shelters, Paris, Friday, Nov. 4, 2016 (AP photo by Thibault Camus).

When French authorities dismantled the migrant camp in Calais known as the Jungle in late October, many asked what would happen to the encampment’s 9,000 residents. The answer was not long in coming: Rather than relocating to government-run shelters, many simply swelled the ranks of France’s other migrant encampments that had until now escaped the glare of international press coverage. Calais is far from being the only site of France’s migrant crisis. Since June 2015, French police have demolished some 30 makeshift encampments—home to thousands of migrants, primarily from Afghanistan, Ethiopia and Sudan—in Paris. But the crisis worsened following the […]

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