With Talks Stalled, Duterte Is Mobilizing to Crush the Philippines’ Communist Rebels

Members of various affiliated groups of the National Democratic Front of the Philippines and Communist Party of the Philippines attend a rally in Quezon City, Philippines, March 27, 2017 (Sipa photo by Gregorio B. Dantes via AP).
Members of various affiliated groups of the National Democratic Front of the Philippines and Communist Party of the Philippines attend a rally in Quezon City, Philippines, March 27, 2017 (Sipa photo by Gregorio B. Dantes via AP).
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In mid-February, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said he would pay government forces a bounty of nearly $500 for each communist rebel they killed, according to The Associated Press, suggesting this would be a cost-effective way to combat a decades-long insurgency. His remarks, which were widely denounced as inflammatory, came amid an uptick in violence between government forces and the rebels and increasingly bleak prospects for peace talks, which broke down last year. In an email interview, Renato DeCastro, a professor of international studies at De La Salle University in Manila, explains why the peace process has stalled, what progress has […]

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