With Mugabe Finally on the Way Out, Where Is Zimbabwe Headed?

Zimbabwean soldiers bump fists with joyful protesters thanking them for their intervention, Harare, Zimbabwe, Nov. 18, 2017 (AP photo by Ben Curtis).
Zimbabwean soldiers bump fists with joyful protesters thanking them for their intervention, Harare, Zimbabwe, Nov. 18, 2017 (AP photo by Ben Curtis).

Robert Mugabe became Zimbabwe’s prime minister in 1980 in the country’s first multiracial elections, after it finally won its independence from British rule. He has served as president or prime minister of the country ever since. Roughly 85 percent of Zimbabwe’s population has never known another leader. Despite his frail health and various opposition movements over the years, Mugabe has repeatedly found a way to hold on to power. Until last week. Early Wednesday morning, shortly after tanks started appearing on the streets in and near Harare, members of the Zimbabwe Defense Forces went on the national broadcaster, ZBC, to […]

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