Iran’s Engineered Election Leaves Reformists With No Good Options

A supporter of presidential candidate Ebrahim Raisi during a rally in Tehran, Iran, June 14, 2021 (AP photo by Ebrahim Noroozi).
A supporter of presidential candidate Ebrahim Raisi during a rally in Tehran, Iran, June 14, 2021 (AP photo by Ebrahim Noroozi).
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Iranians will go to the polls this Friday to choose the successor to centrist President Hassan Rouhani, who is winding down his second four-year term and cannot run for reelection. The polls will take place in an atmosphere of widespread public apathy, as voters choose from a list of presidential candidates that has been heavily vetted beforehand. Of the seven contenders approved last month by the Guardian Council—an oversight body of 12 clerics who are closely aligned with Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei—five are regarded as hard-liners, while the other two are uncharismatic moderates with relatively low profiles. Ebrahim Raisi, a […]

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