With Eye on Russia, Poland Reshapes Military Modernization Plan

Crew of a Polish Wolverine Armored Personnel Carrier practice demounting and taking up defensive positions during a live fire exercise as part of Exercise Steadfast Jazz at the Drawsko Pomorskie Training Area, Poland, Nov. 6, 2013 (NATO photo).
Crew of a Polish Wolverine Armored Personnel Carrier practice demounting and taking up defensive positions during a live fire exercise as part of Exercise Steadfast Jazz at the Drawsko Pomorskie Training Area, Poland, Nov. 6, 2013 (NATO photo).

Ironically for Poland, World War II—a conflict that officially started in order to defend Polish sovereignty and territorial integrity—resulted in the country ceasing to exist as an independent state and military actor. During the Cold War, the Polish People’s Republic military, which was the second-strongest member of the Warsaw Pact after the Soviet Union, primarily served Moscow’s plans, rather than Polish national interests. Formed with little divergence from Soviet vision and doctrine, it was large, with over 400,000 troops in peacetime; heavy, with over 7,000 tanks and armored vehicles; hierarchical; and devoid of indigenous strategic guidance. The fall of the […]

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