Business as Usual Won’t End Malaysia’s Political Paralysis

A protester holds a placard during a demonstration demanding the then-prime minister step down, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, July 31, 2021 (AP photo by FL Wong).
A protester holds a placard during a demonstration demanding the then-prime minister step down, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, July 31, 2021 (AP photo by FL Wong).

Two recent state-level elections in Malaysia have put the spotlight on the country’s volatile political landscape, ahead of national elections that many expect to be called this year. The scandal-tainted ruling United Malays National Organization, or UMNO, came out strengthened from victories in both campaigns, while the opposition Pakatan Harapan’s disappointing performance presents it with new challenges in its efforts to return to power. But backroom deals and maneuvers by political elites in Kuala Lumpur are leaving many ordinary Malaysians frustrated and disillusioned with a political system that seems riddled by corruption and unresponsive to their needs.  Mahathir Mohamad, the […]

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