Will Trump’s Mexico Tariffs Finally Force Congress to Rein In His Bullying?

Trucks lined up to cross from Mexico into the United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 31, 2019 (AP photo by Christian Torrez).
Trucks lined up to cross from Mexico into the United States, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 31, 2019 (AP photo by Christian Torrez).

President Donald Trump has repeatedly shown that when it comes to foreign policy, he prefers bullying over supporting widely held norms. He has embraced dictators while trashing American allies and alliances. He ignores or undermines international institutions that the United States helped to create. And on the trade front, he has slapped tariffs on close allies and partners while invoking vague claims about national security. The latest move came last week, when Trump again threatened trade sanctions against Mexico, a major trading partner, over a humanitarian crisis at the southern border that he helped create. The families escaping violence and […]

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