Will International Peacemaking Be the First Casualty of the Trump Era?

Chadian peacekeepers with the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) patrol the streets, Kidal, Mali, Dec. 17, 2016 (U.N. photo by Sylvain Liechti).
Chadian peacekeepers with the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) patrol the streets, Kidal, Mali, Dec. 17, 2016 (U.N. photo by Sylvain Liechti).

What will international peacemaking look like in the Trump era? Here are five tentative but credible predictions. One: The U.S. will play an increasingly haphazard, and often counterproductive, role in peace processes. Two: Organizations that have always relied on American largesse to function, like the United Nations and NATO, will also struggle to stay relevant. Three: A small host of aspiring alternative peacemakers, ranging from Russia to midsize African powers, will try to fill the resulting political vacuum. Four: The majority of these new peacemakers will dump post-Cold War niceties, such as giving human rights a prominent role in peace […]

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