Will Compaore’s Trial Bring Accountability to Burkina Faso?

Burkinabe protest against longtime President Blaise Compaore, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Oct. 30, 2014 (AP photo by Theo Renault).
Burkinabe protest against longtime President Blaise Compaore, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Oct. 30, 2014 (AP photo by Theo Renault).

On Thursday, more than two dozen ministers from the government of former President Blaise Compaore appeared in Burkina Faso’s capital, Ouagadougou, for the opening of a trial over the events that precipitated their ouster two and a half years ago. Though Compaore’s legal team successfully obtained a one-week postponement, Burkinabe got to see their once-untouchable leadership answering to a court that could potentially hold them accountable for at least some of the crimes committed by the old regime. The case is no doubt symbolically important for a country that endured nearly three decades of Compaore’s inefficient and corrupt rule, followed […]

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