After Years of Turmoil, There Is Hope for Stability and Reform in Lesotho

After Years of Turmoil, There Is Hope for Stability and Reform in Lesotho
Lesotho’s then-prime minister, Thomas Thabane, and his wife Maesaiah attend a court hearing in Maseru, Feb. 24, 2020 (AP photo).

Ha Abia is a sprawling, dusty neighborhood on the outskirts of Maseru, the capital of Lesotho. Bisected by the main highway heading south from the city, it flashes past in a blur of roadside taverns, small grocery stores, street vendors and the ubiquitous honking of local taxis. Since 1998, it has been the political home of Lesotho’s two-time prime minister, Thomas Motsoahae Thabane. In the past year, Thabane has faced growing political opposition, which came to a head in April, when he was charged in connection with his ex-wife’s murder in 2017. Thabane tried for weeks to negotiate a deal […]

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