Why This Year’s World Wildlife Conference Was ‘a Major Victory for Conservation’

A ranger reaches out toward a female northern white rhino at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya, Aug. 23, 2019 (AP photo by Ben Curtis).
A ranger reaches out toward a female northern white rhino at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya, Aug. 23, 2019 (AP photo by Ben Curtis).
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Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, known as CITES, held their 18th conference last month in Geneva. Many conservation advocates welcomed the results of the meeting, which established new protections for a variety of species, from giraffes to sea cucumbers. In a phone interview with WPR, Tanya Sanerib, the international legal director at the Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental group, discusses the many positive outcomes from this year’s CITES meeting and the hard work that remains to prevent more species from going extinct. The following transcript has been lightly edited […]

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