Why the Work of Independent Election Observers Just Got More Difficult

A man casts his vote for the parliamentary election at a polling station in Seoul, South Korea, April 15, 2020 (AP photo by Ahn Young-joon).
A man casts his vote for the parliamentary election at a polling station in Seoul, South Korea, April 15, 2020 (AP photo by Ahn Young-joon).

The coronavirus pandemic has created a vexing challenge for democratic societies: How to safely hold free and fair elections. Some countries that saw early success in containing the spread of COVID-19, like South Korea, have been able to hold national elections safely, while a slew of others have been forced to postpone their votes. The pandemic has also changed the facts on the ground for independent election observers. For this week’s interview on Trend Lines, WPR’s Elliot Waldman is joined by David Carroll, director of the Democracy Program at the Carter Center. He has participated in dozens of observation missions […]

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